Archives for posts with tag: gender

During a residency at the Center for Photography in Woodstock, New York, the artist Endia Beal took a group of middle-aged white women to a black hair salon. There, they were given a hairstyle typically seen on black women. After being styled, the women were photographed in a traditional corporate portrait.
The idea for this project came to Beal when she was working in a computer lab at Yale. Sporting a large red afro herself, she heard that many men in the office wanted to touch her hair. Her art project originates from this experience and wants to open discussion about different race, gender and generations. Beal raises questions about how we see ourselves, especially in the corporate world, as the ideal corporate appearance remains, in most cases and even for white women, the white male with his power suits.
For this series, she specifically wanted to work with women at least in their 40s: “I wanted people that had a certain idea of what you’re supposed to look like in the workspace, because it would be a challenge for them to understand what I experienced in that space,” she said. “ And to a degree, many young white women have shared that experience, but for older white women it’s an experience they haven’t necessarily had.” She added that the project is all about taking a risk, stepping out of your comfort zone, and trying out a new experience. Besides the physical opposition between a white woman and her black hair, the most compelling aspect of this work are all of the complicated histories, assumptions, silences and transformations that make the viewer see this issue as a discrepancy in the first place.

AnnAnn BethBeth CharlotteCharlotte ChristinaChristina ChristineChristine EllenEllen LynnLynn ©Endia Beal

Advertisements

In the southern state of Oaxaca, Mexico, live so-called muxes: Men who think of themselves as women. What is so exceptional about this is the fact that they are not marginalized or bullied, but accepted and celebrated. Their social status reaches back into times before Mexico became Catholic, when there were cross-dressing Aztec priests and the culture was inherently flexible in regard to gender. Of course, like in most – if not all – Latin American countries, machismo prevails now and there is not much room for different attitudes towards sex. But in the state of Oaxaca, things managed to remain more fluid. The population believes that the muxes have special intellectual and artistic gifts, that they are lucky, chosen people, colonizing the volatile state between genders. They are considered a third gender rather than having a particular sexual orientation.
Nicola “Ókin” Frioli travelled to Juchitán and photographed the muxes for his series “We Are Princesses in a Land of Machos”. Stunning pictures and beautiful people.

Nicola_Frioli-_5

Nicola_Frioli-_1

Nicola_Frioli-_2

Nicola_Frioli-_3

Nicola_Frioli-_4

Nicola_Frioli_5

Nicola_Frioli-_6

Nicola_Frioli_7
©Nicola “Ókin” Frioli

You make assumptions about someone the minute you see this person – about their status, their personality, heck, probably even about their sex life. Everybody does that, it’s normal; I guess you could call it human nature. But isn’t it interesting that you probably do that even if you only see part of the person’s body? You don’t think so? Well, try looking at these women’s legs without your mind instantly starting to guess what kind of woman she is. Stacey Baker, an associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, is the photographer behind these pictures. Since March, she has photographed more than 300 legs in New York City. The idea for the project, called Citilegs, came when she was passing through the lobby of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel on Park Avenue and saw a woman with delicate legs wearing a pretty black coat.  “For some reason, I thought it would make a nice picture”, she says. Well, I find the pictures strangely captivating; they really make me want to see and know more about the women behind the legs, or rather, above them.

Citilegs_2Citilegs_12Citilegs_8Citilegs_13Citilegs_15Citilegs_6

The pictures I want to show you today are from different ad campaigns and editorials. Their different takes on masculinity and androgyny really caught my eye. I particularly like the Alexander Wang ad, I find the model’s pose and expression very striking. And I wouldn’t mind owning the outfit in the Calvin Klein ad.

Malgosia Bela for Alexander Wang Fall/Winter 13/14, shot by Steven KleinAlexander Wang FW 13.14

Daria Werbowy for Vogue Paris August 2013, shot by David SimsVOGUE PARIS AUGUST 2013 - DARIA WERBOWY BY DAVID SIMS_1

Karmen Pedaru for Vogue Paris August 2013, shot by Gilles BensimonKarmen Pedaru by Gilles Bensimon for Vogue Paris August 2013 [Editorial]

Vanessa Axente for Calvin Klein Fall/Winter 13/14, shot by Mert Alas&Marcus PiggottCalvin Klein-Herbst 2013

Crista Cober for Jalouse Magazine July/August 2013, shot by Frederike Helwig'On The Riviera' Crista Cober by Frederike Helwig for Jalouse Magazine July:August 2013 [Editorial]

Hilary Rhoda for Helmut Lang Fall/Winter 13/14, shot by Daniel JacksonHilary Rhoda for Helmut Lang FW 13.14 Campaign by Daniel Jackson