Archives for category: Think

talley
“The world has become too casual, and people have become lazy. There was a time when people went on the airplane with gloves.” Former fashion editor of Vogue André Leon Talley in Vanity Fair.
I’d like to share a childhood memory with you that nicely illustrates this thought:  I grew up in Brazil and during the holiday season, our family travelled to Switzerland, where my grandparents lived.  I vividly remember how my mother, every single time before we left the house to go to the airport, meticulously put on her makeup and spritzed on some perfume, dressed herself impeccably in some wide legged, light trousers and a silk, yellow or powder pink blouse, slipped her feet into some stylish high-heels and grabbed her beauty case – the only hand baggage beside her Louis Vuitton Noe Drawstring bag she would carry. I remember her long, red nails and her thick, blondish-brown hair cascading down her back.  Yes, these were the days…

You make assumptions about someone the minute you see this person – about their status, their personality, heck, probably even about their sex life. Everybody does that, it’s normal; I guess you could call it human nature. But isn’t it interesting that you probably do that even if you only see part of the person’s body? You don’t think so? Well, try looking at these women’s legs without your mind instantly starting to guess what kind of woman she is. Stacey Baker, an associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, is the photographer behind these pictures. Since March, she has photographed more than 300 legs in New York City. The idea for the project, called Citilegs, came when she was passing through the lobby of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel on Park Avenue and saw a woman with delicate legs wearing a pretty black coat.  “For some reason, I thought it would make a nice picture”, she says. Well, I find the pictures strangely captivating; they really make me want to see and know more about the women behind the legs, or rather, above them.

Citilegs_2Citilegs_12Citilegs_8Citilegs_13Citilegs_15Citilegs_6

Kirstie ClementsImageClements’ last Vogue coverVogue-AUST-July12

The Guardian published an excerpt from former Australian Vogue editor Kirstie Clements’ new memoir, The Vogue Factor. In it, she describes how the modelling and fashion industries as a system are highly troubled. Even though she admits that the use of ever-thinner models is wrong and unhealthy, she writes: “It cannot be denied that visually, clothes fall better on a slimmer frame.” Isn’t that really a matter of taste? Acquired taste, certainly, taste brainwashed into our minds by exactly the same magazines Clements is writing about? Isn’t that also sort of lazy? She goes on saying: “The ‘fit’ model begins the fashion process: designer outfits are created around a live, in-house skeleton. Few designers have a curvy or petite fit model.” Well, what a surprise: Clothing looking better on the frame it was designed for and designed on! Clements quote makes it look as if there’s something inherent about clothes that make them look better on thin bodies, rather than the design process being the result of an imposed idea of beauty. If a designer claims to only be able to design for one body type, well, then he probably shows a lack of talent or creativity.

Go over to The Guardian and check out the article for yourself, it’s a lengthy, but quite interesting read.

Recently, I read something interesting. According to a survey conducted by ModCloth, more U.S. women report wearing a size 16 dress than a size 2 and 0 combined. But despite that fact, it is very difficult for larger women to find plus-sized items in-store. So if they want something to wear – and God forbid, something stylish – they have to shop online. Even very popular brands like H&M, American Apparel or Urban Outfitters do not carry sizes 12 or 14 in their stores. Some of them do make them – you just have to go online to buy them. But that creates a new problem: According to Kenyatta Jones, CEO of clothing line Bella Rene, “if you’re stuck shopping online, nine times out of 10 you’re going to get something that doesn’t fit … Fit is very important for us, but if you’re ordering it online as opposed to trying it on in-store, you’re just going to end up sending it back and then you have nothing.” Sally McGraw, a style and body image writer, confirms that thought: “To relegate plus-size lines to online only and never give those women the opportunity to try on the clothing in person, look at themselves in the mirror in a store, get feedback from a sales associate, look at other options — you know, the full shopping experience — means that they are definitely missing out.”

That got me thinking: Why could that probably be? I mean, normally, people will do just about everything to make big bucks. So why is this huge market being neglected? Do shops not want so-called “fat” people in their stores? Is it about brand image? Is it more difficult to make larger clothes? Jones thinks that retailers don’t think of plus-size women as trendy shoppers: “Oh, they don’t need clothes, all they do is… eat Twinkies.” She goes on to say that the fashion industry seems to think of “fat” people as lazy, uneducated and not in the market for style.

So, what do you think? What prevents designers to put plus-size clothing in their stores? Could it be that they assume that larger sizes won’t sell? Tell me in the comments!