Archives for category: Read

Jil Sander is leaving her eponymous label for the third time after designing for three seasons. She first left in 2000 after Prada bought a controlling stake in her company, only to come back in 2003 and then exit again in 2004. After Raf Simons started his tenure as Dior’s creative director in 2012, it was announced that she would be returning once again. Her last collection showed at spring-summer 2014 Milan Fashion Week. According to WWD, she is leaving for personal reasons; her in-house design team will be responsible for the Fall 2014 collection. Even though I liked what Simons did for the brand better than what Sander did herself, it makes more sense to me if the person whose name is on the label also actually designs the clothes. So I don’t know what to think of it. I guess, let speculation about who will replace her begin.

_ARC0313.450x675jil-sander-spring-2014©style.com

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Do you think that female business leaders, politicians or women in any position of power, for that matter, are allowed to be fashionable? To put on make-up? To spend money on expensive clothes? To wear high heels? To color their hair? Or would you have more respect for them if they dressed and looked mousy? Take the constant attacks on fashion-loving Marissa Meyer, Yahoo!’s CEO, who can be seen in a glamorous shoot in Vogue’s September issue, or on Texas state Senator Wendy Davis, who admittedly likes to dress in designer clothes. See also the ongoing debate about Michelle Obama’s style. Women can’t really win here: As Anna Holmes writes in an article for Times: “[W]omen who take an active interest in fashion and beauty are to both be commended (personal grooming is indicative of self-respect) and humored (personal grooming is superficial)”.  She goes on to “yearn for a time when female competence in one area is not undermined by enthusiasm for another.” At the end of the day, it’s probably still a question of  the “continuing cultural discomfort with the mere existence of women in powerful positions.” as Amanda Marcotte writes in the article she wrote for slate.com. I couldn’t agree more. So, what’s your take?

Marissa Mayer in Voguemarissa-mayer-vogue

Wendy Davis, also in VogueWendy-Davis-Vogue

talley
“The world has become too casual, and people have become lazy. There was a time when people went on the airplane with gloves.” Former fashion editor of Vogue André Leon Talley in Vanity Fair.
I’d like to share a childhood memory with you that nicely illustrates this thought:  I grew up in Brazil and during the holiday season, our family travelled to Switzerland, where my grandparents lived.  I vividly remember how my mother, every single time before we left the house to go to the airport, meticulously put on her makeup and spritzed on some perfume, dressed herself impeccably in some wide legged, light trousers and a silk, yellow or powder pink blouse, slipped her feet into some stylish high-heels and grabbed her beauty case – the only hand baggage beside her Louis Vuitton Noe Drawstring bag she would carry. I remember her long, red nails and her thick, blondish-brown hair cascading down her back.  Yes, these were the days…

Kirstie ClementsImageClements’ last Vogue coverVogue-AUST-July12

The Guardian published an excerpt from former Australian Vogue editor Kirstie Clements’ new memoir, The Vogue Factor. In it, she describes how the modelling and fashion industries as a system are highly troubled. Even though she admits that the use of ever-thinner models is wrong and unhealthy, she writes: “It cannot be denied that visually, clothes fall better on a slimmer frame.” Isn’t that really a matter of taste? Acquired taste, certainly, taste brainwashed into our minds by exactly the same magazines Clements is writing about? Isn’t that also sort of lazy? She goes on saying: “The ‘fit’ model begins the fashion process: designer outfits are created around a live, in-house skeleton. Few designers have a curvy or petite fit model.” Well, what a surprise: Clothing looking better on the frame it was designed for and designed on! Clements quote makes it look as if there’s something inherent about clothes that make them look better on thin bodies, rather than the design process being the result of an imposed idea of beauty. If a designer claims to only be able to design for one body type, well, then he probably shows a lack of talent or creativity.

Go over to The Guardian and check out the article for yourself, it’s a lengthy, but quite interesting read.