Archives for category: Editorial

Beauty and physical perfection is a strange, much discussed, elusive and fascinating thing. We can’t get enough of it, we strive for it, we want to surround ourselves with it and ogle it wherever we can. Vogue Paris seems to feel the same: In its November issue’s “Body Double” editorial, photographers Inez and Vinoodh shot not only one Gisele, but pictured the model multiple times in one shot, so as if they just couldn’t get enough of her.

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'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_1  'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_3 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_4 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_5 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_6 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_7 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_8 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_9 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_10 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_11 'Body Double' Gisele Bundchen by Inez & Vinoodh for Vogue Paris November 2013_12© Vogue Paris

The only thing I would change in this editorial is the choice of models: I wish they had cast much more unconventionally beautiful women than shown here with stronger, edgier faces. Other than that, I have nothing to complain about this shoot, inspired by Dutch Golden Age paintings and shot by Josh Olins for Vogue UK’s December 2013 issue.

'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_1 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_2 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_3 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_4 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_5 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_6 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_7 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_8 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_9 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_10 'Still Life' UK Vogue December 2013_11© Vogue UK

Just beautiful, beautiful pictures:
Model Julia Nobis and her brothers, four-year-old Luka and Raphael, photographed by Stephen Ward at the Hillsdale Orange Orchard in Bulga, New South Wales for the October 2013 issue of Vogue Australia.

Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 1 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 2 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 3 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 4 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 5 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 6 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 7 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 8 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 9 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 10 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 11 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 12 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 13 Julia Nobis by Stephen Ward for Vogue Australia October 2013 14© Vogue Australia

The fashion industry is obsessed with everything pretty and beautiful, so it’s always refreshing when you come along an editorial that leaves you slightly disturbed and asking yourself WTF?, like the one in Let’s Panic’s first edition did. According to the bi-annual glossy, founded by photographers Greg Kadel and Aaron Ward, it is “committed to exploring the creative. Each story is a collaboration between editors and contributors which result in a cultural statement of individuality that transcends the ordinary and allows opportunities to evolve in an arena free of constraints.” Yeah, all pretentious babbling aside, I just really like how Malgosia Bela, the Polish model shot here, seems to have gotten (almost) free of any vanity, making funny faces and rolling her eyes until there is only the white left, thus creating some bizarre and uncommon fashion pictures. Inspirations for the styling range from football gear to Japanese samurai clothing.

Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Let’s Panic Magazine No.1Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _2 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _4 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _5 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _6 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _7 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _8 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _9 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _10 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1 _11 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1_1 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1_3 Malgosia Bela by Aaron Ward for Lets Panic Magazine No.1_12© Let’s Panic Magazine No.1

So, I normally don’t like it when women are reduced to their (sexual) body; most often than not, it comes off as sexist. But somehow, these pictures don’t offend me. Perhaps it is because in the first batch, even though the models are clad in sexy bikinis, they seem to be in power and in control. And in the second series, the focus is so much on presenting the clothes in the best possible way that a face would almost distract from them.
That being said, it’s interesting that two different publications had the same idea: Let’s just crop the model’s head out of the picture! First, we have Carine Roitfeld, who in her latest editorial for CR Fashion Book is proposing to more or less wear a bikini as a top. Photographed by Hans Neumann, the “Working Remotely” editorial sees a headless model donning this summer’s chicest pencil skirts by Saint Laurent, Miu Miu, Louis Vuitton, Alexander Wang and Dolce & Gabbana. Then, we have The New York Times Style Magazine with their Runway Report: The Curious Appeal of Pieces That Clash. The finest Fall pieces from a wide range of designers are mixed and matched beautifully. So, what do you think? Do you like the spreads?

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The New York Times Style Magazine25look-runway-custom1 25look-runway-custom2  25look-runway-custom8  25look-runway-custom10  25look-runway-custom13 25look-runway-custom15 25look-runway-custom16 25look-runway-custom17 25look-runway-custom18

Do you think that female business leaders, politicians or women in any position of power, for that matter, are allowed to be fashionable? To put on make-up? To spend money on expensive clothes? To wear high heels? To color their hair? Or would you have more respect for them if they dressed and looked mousy? Take the constant attacks on fashion-loving Marissa Meyer, Yahoo!’s CEO, who can be seen in a glamorous shoot in Vogue’s September issue, or on Texas state Senator Wendy Davis, who admittedly likes to dress in designer clothes. See also the ongoing debate about Michelle Obama’s style. Women can’t really win here: As Anna Holmes writes in an article for Times: “[W]omen who take an active interest in fashion and beauty are to both be commended (personal grooming is indicative of self-respect) and humored (personal grooming is superficial)”.  She goes on to “yearn for a time when female competence in one area is not undermined by enthusiasm for another.” At the end of the day, it’s probably still a question of  the “continuing cultural discomfort with the mere existence of women in powerful positions.” as Amanda Marcotte writes in the article she wrote for slate.com. I couldn’t agree more. So, what’s your take?

Marissa Mayer in Voguemarissa-mayer-vogue

Wendy Davis, also in VogueWendy-Davis-Vogue

So, Lady Gaga released her new video yesterday and of course, the main thing I’m interested in is: What the hell is she wearing? With her usual theatrics and shenanigans you can always count on some major fashion statement, so let’s see some of the things she came up with this time.
Brandon Maxwell, Gaga’s stylist, explained that the concept for the video was: “What would you do for the applause?” Not digging very deep here, since the song’s title is “Applause”… Well, whatever, I’m not here for some pseudo-intellectual babble, I’m here for the costumes, so let’s get to them!
First, we have a surreal top by Jean-Charles de Castelbajac that looks like two gloved hands grasping her breasts, worn with a matching glove-choker, coordinating leather gloves and some glove-panties.
Gaga_8Gaga_3Well, of course, she wasn’t the first who came up with that idea:barbra-hand-gloves

Next, we have a a custom Gareth Pugh pillow gown worn over a black catsuit by Mila Schön. Very simple, very beautiful.Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.47.03Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.47.38

When I saw the green jacket Gaga is wearing next, I knew I had seen it not too long ago: Yep, it was the Maison Martin Margiela Couture jacket shown a couple of months ago at Paris Couture week. Gaga’s sister Natali Germanotta designed the mirror-and-pin costume she’s wearing it with.Gaga_4Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.48.41Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.59.06Margiela_3b

The lingerie Gaga is wearing here is by Valentino Couture, the boots are Alaïa. Quite boring, really, and I think I saw a similar pair of panties at H&M last week.Gaga_10Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.59.48Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.00.00

The seashell pasties and bottoms were made by Perry Meek from fresh flowers, glue, sea shells, obviously, and string. And yes, the inspiration behind this outfit – no prizes for guessing that right – is Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus. The singer recently tweeted a photo of her in that outift with the hashtag #boticellibabe.Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.19.22Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.24.49Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.24.17Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.20.13

The wings worn here are made by Junker Designs from broken umbrella spokes.Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.15.23Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.15.32Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.22.44

Maxwell commissioned New York based fashion designer Mathieu Mirano to design this bra. He said that it was made of duct tape that had been burned with a blow torch; it had crystals on it and safety pins stuck through it for a rougher feel.Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.37.04Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 13.37.17

And last, but not least: How beautiful does Gaga look in these stills? Gorgeous, non?Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.24.17Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.48.57Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.49.59Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.50.58Bildschirmfoto 2013-08-20 um 12.50.11

The faces of fashion are white, young and thin. No breaking news here. When a magazine decides to use a plus-sized model in an editorial, the emphasis lies on the fact that she’s not “straight-sized” and she’s often nude or semi-nude. It’s extremely rare that a heavier model is used without her curves being explicitly mentioned and made the focus of the spread. The same goes with age. It will be the main subject of the article and it will be mentioned how good the model still looks – for her age, of course. And most often than not, you will see the face of one of the supes of yesteryear like Linda, Christy or Helena.
Harper’s Bazaar is now doing an “homage to the diversity of women” in their September issue, cast and styled by the magazine’s Global Fashion Director Carine Roitfeld and shot by Karl Lagerfeld. I seriously don’t know what to think about this editorial. First, and most importantly, I think that diversity should be normal, a thing seen in every magazine, all the time, without a special mention, without it being an “homage”. The variety of model shape, age, size and race used here is rare and great, but it would be even better if it were just a “normal” editorial, not an oddity. I also don’t know what to make of the juxtaposition of old and young, big and small, straight-sized and plus-sized. What exactly is the point here? To show how crazy-old one model is? Or how freakishly tall another? It kind of leaves a bitter aftertaste and reminds me a little bit of a circus freak show. So, what do you think? Am I being too sensitive? Or do you agree?

Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_001 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_002 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_003 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_004 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_005 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_006 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_007 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_008 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_009 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_010 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_011 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_012 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_013 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_014 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_015 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_016 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_017 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_018 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013_019 Harper_s_Bazaar_Australia_September_2013© Harper’s Bazaar Australia

Honestly? Here is the reason that these days, I’m rarely blown away by the American edition of Vogue. Jennifer Lawrence’s pictures are pretty, sure… pretty boring. And it’s the September issue, where the fashion should be breathtaking, gorgeous and out-of-this-world – not lame and dull like in this spread (I mean, in the cover picture you can’t even see what the girl is wearing, for crying out loud). Sure, you could argue that the photographs accompany an article about an actress and that it’s not a fashion spread, but I would say that you’re wrong, since it’s Vogue, not a movie magazine, and readers want to see clothes, no matter what. At least Lawrence looks like herself and isn’t excessively photoshopped, I guess? But is this really now where we’re at? That we’re happy that the person depicted is recognizable? I read somewhere that Anna Wintour should go helm a political magazine or newspaper. And you know what, that wouldn’t be the worst idea. American Vogue is in desperate need of a breath of fresh air.Jennifer Lawrence by Mario Testino for Vogue US September 2013 6Jennifer Lawrence by Mario Testino for Vogue US September 2013 1Jennifer Lawrence by Mario Testino for Vogue US September 2013 2Jennifer Lawrence by Mario Testino for Vogue US September 2013 3Jennifer Lawrence by Mario Testino for Vogue US September 2013 4Jennifer Lawrence by Mario Testino for Vogue US September 2013 5
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So, why am I showing you this editorial, shot by Alasdair McLellan for Purple Fashion Magazine‘s Fall/Winter 13/14 edition? First of all, I really like Cara Delevingne’s face. Hmmm, that came out kind of weird… I think she has very striking features. Yep, that’s better. Then I really like the slightly defiant expression she’s sporting throughout the shoot. She isn’t trying to be sexy or to look older than she is. She just looks like the teenager she is (wearing clothes a normal teenager wouldn’t possibly be able to afford, but that, of course, is totally besides the point). She looks sulky, somehow uneasy with the world, insecure but very much thinking that she just knows everything better than any old adult trying to explain her the world. In some of the pictures, she almost seems kind of shy, but never submissive or the object of a leering audience’s attention. So, well done, Cara and Purple Fashion Magazine.CARA DELEVINGNE BY ALASDAIR MCLELLAN FOR PURPLE FASHION MAGAZINE FW 13.14_2Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013-001_1Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013-003Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013-004Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013-005Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013-006Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013-007Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013-008Cara Delevingne Purple Fashion Magazine FW 2013-009Cara Delevingne shot by Alasdair McLellan